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Paradise Valley Home Feels Collected, Not Designed

Paradise Valley Home Feels Collected, Not Designed

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREY CRAWFORD

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“I believe that a house should feel collected, not designed,” states designer Jennifer Dyer. “Even with a new home, I’ll choose individual pieces from a variety of sources so that it feels as if the client has traveled the world to amass an assorted collection.”

Dyer, based in both Scottsdale and West Hollywood, California, takes this approach with all of her projects, yet it is particularly relevant to the elegant interiors she created for Roger Hansen’s tri-level home in Paradise Valley. “I was referred to Jennifer by another client of hers who actually had a very modern house,” says Hansen, a Minnesota businessman who lives here part-time. “I was looking for something more traditional but could see that she had a very good eye. I only told her, ‘Don’t give me too many choices,’ and then just sat back and entrusted her with the job.”

Originally designed and built by Rod Cullum before it was owned by Hansen, the house has an exterior architecture that features natural stone veneer, mulled windows with deep window wells, large overhangs and barrel-vaulted ceilings. “The home was intended to be Tuscan,” says Dyer, “but I felt that the interiors should look more Spanish Mediterranean.” So, the designer began pouring through numerous books for inspiration, studying that particular style to get a feel for its period elements and characteristics. She even changed the home’s front doors to showcase more of a Spanish aesthetic.”

Items that had already been installed or purchased for the home but did not fit with Dyer’s concept, such as the carpeting, light fixtures and vanities, were sent off to the local Habitat for Humanity and replaced. Leftover exterior stone was brought in and used for the walls of the living room and bar area—similar brickwork appears in the dining room ceiling—and the rooms were directed toward the spectacular vistas. “We wanted to capture the impact of Camelback Mountain in the distance,” says Cullum, whom Dyer brought back on board the now lived-in residence to turn her interior detailing into reality. “To that end, we created large mechanical glass walls and used every opportunity to capture the views.””

Due to the surrounding landscape’s lack of color, Dyer incorporated a palette of light celadon, deep green, blue and cream to warm up the interiors. Dark moss green chairs are a focal point of the dining room, while an antique blue and gray flat-weave rug establishes the master bedroom’s soft, casual coloration. “Consistency is critical,” Dyer explains. “I believe as a designer that once you start with a color scheme, you have to carry it throughout the home. Otherwise, there is no connection.””

To establish the tone for the house, Dyer went straight to its center—the kitchen—and its knotty alder wood cabinetry. “In order to make the kitchen distinct, I hired specialty finishers to stain and glaze the alder wood cabinetry and built-ins,” she says. “The end result is a green-blue finish that looks well-aged.” Other distinguishing details include a new French stone hood and a thick, highly finished walnut top for the island.”

In keeping with Dyer’s “collected” look, most of the home’s key furniture pieces were either purchased antiques or custom-made to Dyer’s precise specifications. In the formal living room, a pair of custom cream distressed cabinets flanking the stone fireplace features mirrored doors faced with bronze screens and vintage handles. The dining room table, a custom piece with a crackle finish, was inspired by a similar one that Dyer saw in a Kelly Wearstler book.”

In keeping with Dyer’s “collected” look, most of the home’s key furniture pieces were either purchased antiques or custom-made to Dyer’s precise specifications. In the formal living room, a pair of custom cream distressed cabinets flanking the stone fireplace features mirrored doors faced with bronze screens and vintage handles. The dining room table, a custom piece with a crackle finish, was inspired by a similar one that Dyer saw in a Kelly Wearstler book. Furnishings and accessories procured through various antiques shops across the United States and abroad prevail throughout. “It gives the place a much more unique feel,” Dyer says.”

After almost two years, the home Dyer delivered to her client—after weekly emails and monthlong Arizona stays—was spot-on. “I’m really proud of it,” she says. “Because I had complete trust from the client, there was no second-guessing. It just fell into place.” Dyer says.”

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